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Christian Godin

Dividend Paying Stocks in the Gold Sector

WHAT ARE WE LOOKING FOR?
Gold is reaching price highs not seen since 2013, because of dovish central banks and the geopolitical volatility caused by the U.S.-China trade war and, most recently, the U.S.-Iran crisis. Gold is up 21 per cent over the past 12 months. Expect gold miners to report better results in their next quarterly reports. Today, we will be looking more closely at gold miners that pay a dividend. The yield is our proxy for stable operations and we use the change in net operating profit after tax, or NOPAT, to find growing companies.
For the Globe and Mail this week, we look at dividend stocks in the volatile gold sector.

THE SCREEN
We screened the Canadian- and U.S.-listed gold miners by focusing on the following criteria: Market capitalization greater than $1-billion; Dividend yield; 12-month and 24-month change in the company’s NOPAT – appositive figure would indicate that there is growth and progress in operating efficiencies. For informational purposes, we have also included recent stock price, cost of capital (a weighted cost combining equity and debt, expressed as a percentage of total capital) and one-year return. Please note that some ratios maybe reported at the end of the previous quarter.

WHAT WE FOUND
Only 11 gold miners with a market capitalization of more than $1-billion pay a dividend.

Centamin PLC pays the highest dividend by far, but its negative NOPAT change over both 12 and 24 months suggests future dividend growth may not be sustainable. Newmont Goldcorp Corp., Royal Gold Inc., Yamana Gold Inc. and Kirkland Lake Gold Ltd. all show growing NOPAT over the past 12 and 24 months.

As the largest company on our list, suggesting more stable operations than smaller companies in this highly volatile sector, Newmont is well positioned to maintain and increase its dividend. Investors are advised to do further research before investing in any of the companies listed in the accompanying table.

Ticker Name PRICE ($) 1Y PRICE RETURN (%) MARKET CAP. ($BIL) EXPECTED DIV. YIELD (%) LAST QTR DIV. YIELD (%) COST OF CAPITAL (%) NOPAT CH. 24M (%) NOPAT CH. 12M (%)
CEE-T Centamin Plc 2.12 5.37 2.45 4.40 4.00 9.74 -5.61 -3.61
OR-T Osisko Gold Royalties Ltd 12.27 0.5 1.77 1.60 1.62 5.93 0.02 -0.30
NGT-T Newmont Goldcorp Corporation 55.15 28 45.22 1.31 1.48 5.65 1.46 2.07
ABX-T Barrick Gold Corporation 23.29 40.59 41.40 1.08 1.17 5.75 -1.93 0.55
AEM-T Agnico Eagle Mines Limited 77.44 44.66 18.51 1.15 0.91 5.95 -0.88 -0.19
RGLD-Q Royal Gold, Inc. 113.79 33.33 7.46 0.77 0.86 6.20 0.68 1.69
YRI-T Yamana Gold Inc. 4.86 45.4 4.62 1.03 0.79 10.85 0.62 2.26
AGI-T Alamos Gold Inc. 7.5 41.98 2.93 0.70 0.69 9.97 -2.12 -0.86
SVM-T Silvercorp Metals Inc. 7.18 135.59 1.24 0.44 0.65 14.75 -0.32 0.34
BVN-N Compania De Minas Buenaventu 13.97 -14.42 3.54 0.60 0.55 6.57 -7.61 -8.19
KL-T Kirkland Lake Gold Ltd. 58.33 60.15 12.26 0.42 0.31 8.12 4.31 2.86

Dividend Paying Stocks in the Gold Sector

WHAT ARE WE LOOKING FOR?
Gold is reaching price highs not seen since 2013, because of dovish central banks and the geopolitical volatility caused by the U.S.-China trade war and, most recently, the U.S.-Iran crisis. Gold is up 21 per cent over the past 12 months. Expect gold miners to report better results in their next quarterly reports. Today, we will be looking more closely at gold miners that pay a dividend. The yield is our proxy for stable operations and we use the change in net operating profit after tax, or NOPAT, to find growing companies.
For the Globe and Mail this week, we look at dividend stocks in the volatile gold sector.

THE SCREEN
We screened the Canadian- and U.S.-listed gold miners by focusing on the following criteria: Market capitalization greater than $1-billion; Dividend yield; 12-month and 24-month change in the company’s NOPAT – appositive figure would indicate that there is growth and progress in operating efficiencies. For informational purposes, we have also included recent stock price, cost of capital (a weighted cost combining equity and debt, expressed as a percentage of total capital) and one-year return. Please note that some ratios maybe reported at the end of the previous quarter.

WHAT WE FOUND

Only 11 gold miners with a market capitalization of more than $1-billion pay a dividend.

 

Log in to you account to get additional information in Number Cruncher Extra or to modify the original screener.

Portfolio Manager’s January comment For Q4 2019

Global equities ended the year with a bang! The S&P/TSX Composite Total Return Index increased by 3.2% in Q4 adding to this years’ gains for a total return of 22.9% in 2019. During Q4, the S&P500 produced an 8.5% return for an annual total return of 28.9% while the MSCI ACWI ex US posted a 9.0% return leading to a 22.1% YTD total return.
There was a number of drivers behind this strong finish. Firstly, most company’s results were inline or better than expected, secondly central banks have maintained a dovish tone, and finally the year ended with a phase one agreement between the US and China.
In Canada, the best Q4 sectors were Info-Tech up 10.7% and Materials up 7.4%, the worst sector was Healthcare down 6.0%. For the year, Info-Tech and Utilities were the top performers up 63.5% and 31.6%, respectively, while Healthcare was the weakest on, down 11.4%.
NQICA in Q4 returned 2.5% leading to an annual total return of 24.1% versus the S&P/TSX TR composite which returned 3.2% in Q4 and 22.9% YTD.
The worst performers in the NQICA in Q4 were Gildan Activewear (GIL) with a return of -18.1%, due to lower than expected results, and Metro (MRU) with a -7.8% return. On the other hand, the best performers were Parex up 19.0%, due to excellent results and new field discoveries, and National Bank up 10.4% on the back of an excellent Q4.

Retailers that are no Christmas Gifts

What we are looking for?

With Black Friday still fresh in our minds we decided to look at North American retailers that may look tempting based on yield but that face deteriorating economics. More precisely we selected dividend-paying stocks and we screened them based profitability trends and other fundamental quality criteria.

 

The screen

We screened for consumer discretionary stocks based in North America, specifically, those stocks listed in the subsectors of retailing or consumer durables and apparel. We then added the following criteria:

  • A market capitalization greater than US$1-billion;
  • Stocks must pay a dividend;
  • Return on capital (ROC) of less than 10 per cent in the past 12 months;
  • Declining ROC over the past 24 months;
  • Negative stock price change over the last 12 months;
  • Declining economic value-added (EVA) per share over the past 12 months.
  • Declining sales in the last 12 months.

 

What we found

There are four retailer stocks that meet our criteria in the North American markets. All are U.S.-based brick and mortar retailers: Children’s Place Inc., Bed Bath & Beyond Inc., Gap Inc. and Macy’s Inc. The Children’s Place operates as a children’s specialty apparel retailer with its network of speciality stores. Bed Bath & Beyond operates retail stores that sells domestics merchandise, including bed linens, bath items, kitchen textiles; and home furnishings products. The Gap operates outlets under the Old Navy, Gap, Banana Republic, and other brands. Macys operates department stores under the Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s names as well as a network specialty stores. The reality is that these four retailers are under pressure as online retailers continue gaining market shares.

Topping our list, ranked by dividend yield, is Macy’s. The stock is currently yielding 9.9 per cent. While providing an eye-popping payout, Macy’s is facing profitability challenges as measured by ROC and EVA measures. It is also experiencing declining sales. It will be hard for its board to keep paying this dividend to shareholders unless management succeed in turning around the economics of the business. Given how badly a stock price can react when shareholders are faced with a dividend cut, it’s better to avoid such stocks even if, at first sight, the yield looks attractive.

Investors are advised to do further research before investing in any of the companies shown here.

Ticker Name Price MarketCap Div Yield R/C R/C Ch. 24M Price Var. 12M EVA Ch. 12M Sales Ch. 12M
BBBY Bed Bath & Beyond $         14.58 $1.9B 4.60% -0.64% -11.22% -0.29% -831.39% -5.88%
PLCE Children’s Place $         72.26 $1.1B 3.10% 8.67% -3.59% -45.17% -26.25% -3.04%
GPS Gap, Inc $         16.61 $6.3B 5.84% 9.53% -1.26% -40.44% -101.16% -2.41%
M Macy’s Inc $         15.32 $4.8B 9.86% 6.16% -0.42% -55.79% -441.94% -1.02%

Christian Godin is a portfolio manager at Inovestor Asset Management.

Portfolio Manager’s December comment For November Results

The Canadian stock market realised another month of positive returns in November. This positive outcome unfolded as reported quarterly results were coming in line with investors expectations and in a context of diminishing international trade tensions.

The S&P/TSX Total Return Index rose by 3.6% in November and the S&P 500 also rose by 3.6% while the MSCI World produced a 0.9% positive return. At November end, the 12-months S&P/TSX Total Return Index gain was 15.7% nearly in line with the S&P500 gain of 16.1% and higher than the MSCI World 12-month increase of 11.8%.
The best TSX sector for the month of November was Information Technology up 8.6%, followed by Consumer Staples up 5.8%, and Consumer Discretionary up 5.5%. On the contrary, the worst performing sectors were Health Care (-2.8%), Real Estate (-1.0%) and Material down (0.1%).

Looking more specifically at INOC, the fund was up 5.4% and the best performers in November were Gildan Activewear (+16.4%) the t-shirt manufacturer, Parex Energy (10.1%) an oil producer with assets in Colombia, and Alimentation Couche-Tard. (+10.0%), the Canadian convenience store operator with a global footprint.
On the contrary, the weakest contributor to INOC was Norbord, which was down 4.1%, on after a strong showing in October. The negative contributors were Equitable down 4.1% and TD Bank down 1.8%. All the other constituents of INOC had a positive performance for the month of November.

Eleven industrial stocks that meet our criteria in the North American markets

What are we looking for?

High quality industrial names whose short-term operational returns continue to improve.

The screen

We screened the industrial sector of North American stock universe, focusing on the following criteria:

  • A market capitalization greater than $250-million;
  • A 12-month change in economic value-added (EVA) greater than 200 per cent – a positive figure shows us that the company’s profit is increasing at a faster and greater pace than the costs of capital. The EVA is the economic profit generated by the company and is calculated as the net operating profit after tax (NOPAT) minus capital expenses;
  • A 24-month change in EVA greater than 200 per cent;
  • A five-year average return on capital (ROC) of more than 10 per cent. This is a profitability ratio that measures the returns expected for both debt and equity investors. By including such criteria, we are looking for companies with an excellent long-term track record.

For informational purposes, we have also included recent stock price, dividend yield and one-year return.

Log in to you account to get additional information or to modify the original screener

 

Portfolio Manager’s November Comment For October Results

The S&P/TSX Total Return Index declined by 0.9% in October, the S&P 500 rose by 2.2% and the MSCI ACWI ex. USA rose by 3.5%. At October end, the YTD S&P/TSX Total Return Index was up 18.1% which was lower than the S&P500 23.2% increase but higher than the MSCI ACWI ex. USA return of 16.0%.

The market made new highs in October as trade disputes concerns were dissipating and Q3 financial results were coming in line to better than expected. At month’s end, the US 10-year treasury yields were firming up in both the US and Canadian markets. The best TSX sector in October was Materials up 2.9%, followed by Industrials, up 1%. On the contrary, the worst performing sector was Health Care principally due to the poor performance of the Cannabis sector.

Looking more specifically at INOC, the best performers in October were Norbord (+19.7%), the Canadian manufacturer of wood-based products and leading producer of Oriented Strand Board. The next best performer was Equitable Group (+9.2%), %), a Canadian bank with the bulk of its business involved in the residential mortgages sector.

The NASDAQ Inovestor Canadian Equity Index YTD and Yearly returns stood at 20.2% and 14.7, ahead of the S&P TSX TR corresponding figures of 18.1% and 13.2%.

The Inovestor strategy was rebalanced in October. We increased exposure to the Industrials with the addition of Ritchie Bros Auctioneers Inc. (RBA) and Evertz (ET). We also added Parkland Fuel Corporation (PKI) as their results are strengthening now that their strategic acquisitions are being successfully integrated.

We exited Bell Canada (BCE), Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CM) and Linamar Corp (LNR). These were the holdings with the weakest economic value added (EVA) figures in their respective economic sector.

Portfolio Manager’s September comment For August Results

The Canadian market has been the best performer in August due in part to a strong rally in previous metals (such as gold and silver) and a vigorous GDP of 3.6 versus 3.0 expected. On the other hand, the US GDP was weaker than expected at 2.0 versus 2.3. Global markets were also down as a result from fears of an economic slowdown: Brexit, Hong Kong unrests, inverted interest curve and tariff issues.

The S&P/TSX Total Return Index rose by 0.2% in August, the S&P 500 decreased by -1.8% and the MSCI World by -2.1%. At August end, the YTD S&P/TSX Total Return Index was up 17.1% which was higher than the S&P500 (16.7%) and higher than the MSCI World of 13.5%.

The best TSX sector in August was Information Technology up 7.7%, mainly due to the performance of Shopify, followed by Materials up 5.7%, with gold up 16.7% and silver up 15.4%. On the contrary, the worst performing sector was Health Care (-13%) principally due to the performance of the Cannabis sector.

Looking more specifically at INOC, the best performers in August were Metro Inc. (+9.43%), a Canadian food retailer in Quebec and Ontario, followed by Brookfield Infrastructure Partners (+8.21%), a publicly traded limited partnership involved in the acquisition and management of infrastructure assets globally. Both stocks rallied based on their defensive attributes and as of a result of the inversion of the yield curve.

On the contrary, the weakest contributor to INOC was Parex (PXT), which was down 9.62%, on weak energy prices. The other negative contributors were Linamar (LNR) and CCL Industries (CCL.B) due to disappointing results.

Portfolio Manager’s August comment For July Results

The S&P/TSX Total Return Index rose by 0.34% in July, the S&P 500 by 1.44% and the MSCI ACWI ex. USA declined by 1.18%. At July end, the YTD S&P/TSX Total Return Index was up 16.62% which was lower than the S&P500 (20.24%) but higher than the MSCI ACWI ex. USA of 12.65%.

The market met new highs in July before retracing some of that gain as trade disputes dampened and long-term treasury rates fell to historical lows. At month’s end, the US 10-year treasury yield crossed the 2% mark to the low side.

The best TSX sector in July was Consumer Discretionary up 3.4%, followed by Information Technology, up 3.2%. On the contrary, the worst performing sector was Health Care principally due to the performance of the Cannabis sector.

Looking more specifically at INOC, the best performers in July were Equitable Group (+27.01%), a Canadian bank with the majority of its business involved in the residential mortgages with prime and non prime, who reported better than expected figures for Q2 results. The next best performer was Parex Resources Inc. (+7.38%), an oil producer with assets in Colombia, whose gains were due to the rally in oil prices last month.

On the other hand, the weakest contributor to INOC was Stella Jones (SJ), which was down 12.89%. News in regard to the departure of the company’s long-standing CEO caused the market to react negatively. The other negative contributors were Norbord (OSB) and Linamar (LNR).

Portfolio Manager Q2 Commentary

The S&P/TSX Composite Total Return Index increased by 2.6% in the second quarter. This adds to the first quarter gains for a YTD return of 16.2%. During Q2, the S&P 500 produced a 4.3% return for a YTD rate of 18.5% and the MSCI ACWI ex USA posted a 3.2%, leading to a 14% YTD total return.

Over the 2nd quarter, the FED has confirmed its dovish stance given that inflation and economic activity is under control. The Chinese economy growth has been decelerating resulting in the slowest GDP growth in the last 27 years. On the other hand, expectation for the Canadian growth rate has been on the rise. Reasons for this growth is the stronger than expected exports, better than expected labor market conditions, and higher than expected housing starts.

Our NQICA index returned 4.6% in Q2 and 16.5% YTD versus the S&P/TSX which returned 2.6% in Q2 and 16.2% YTD. The 1-year return for NQICA is 4.4% versus 3.9% for the S&P/TSX over that same period.

The worst performers in the index were Norbord (OSB), down 11%, and Great-West Lifeco down 5.6%. On the contrary, the best performer was Dollarama (DOL), up 29.4%, followed by CCL Industries (CCL.B), up 19%.

At the end of Q2, NQICA was under weighted in Energy (-13%) and Financials (-4%) and over weighted in Consumer Discretionary (15.5%) and Consumer Staples (4.3%).

The current rebalancing requirements are minimal and are entirely due to the model’s sector weights’ variation. The telecom sector weight increased, and the financial sector weight decreased due to the greater economic value added (EVA) created by Telecom versus Financials. Industrial Alliance (IAG), having the lowest SP Score of our financial holdings, was kicked out of the index. IAG was replaced by Telus (T) which is the highest scored telecom company not already in the model.