Category

Number Cruncher

Stock screen for U.S. wealth creators factors in volatility

 

In the filter created earlier this week for The Globe and Mail, we screened for US wealth creators with low volatility by using the following criteria for the S&P 500 universe:

  • A market capitalization of US$1-billion or more;
  • A beta of one or less. A stock with a beta less than one is considered less volatile than the market;
  • A return on capital greater than or equal to 12 per cent, reported as of last quarter’s end;
  • A cost of capital less than 10 per cent, reported as of last quarter’s end;
  • A positive sales change over 12 months and 24 months;
  • A positive free-cash-flow-to-capital ratio. This ratio gives a sense of how well the company uses the invested capital to generate free cash flows, which could be used to stimulate growth, distribute or increase dividends, reduce debt, etc.;
  • A dividend yield greater than 1.75 per cent;
  • A positive share-price return over one year.
  • Future-growth-value-to-market-value (FGV/MV) ratio. FGV/MV represents the proportion of the market value of the company that is made up of future growth expectations, rather than the actual profit generated. The higher the percentage, the higher the baked-in premium for expected growth and the higher the risk.

Read more in this article written by Noor Hussain, Analyst & Account Executive at Inovestor Inc.

In the volatile energy sector, these 13 stocks are generating shareholder wealth

 

In the filter created this week for The Globe and Mail, we screened for Canadian energy stocks creating value for shareholders by using the following criteria:

  • A return on capital equal to or greater than the market average of 5 per cent;
  • An economic performance index change greater than or equal to zero over 12 months. The EPI is the ratio of return on capital to cost of capital. It gives shareholders an idea of how much return is generated from each dollar spent;
  • Positive change in economic value-added (EVA) over 12 and 24 months. This measures the momentum of the wealth-creating ability of the company.  EVA is the net operating profit after tax, or NOPAT, minus capital charge (cost of capital times the amount of invested capital);
  • A positive sales change over 12 months.

Read more in this article written by Noor Hussain, Account Executive at Inovestor Inc.

Stock hunting in this bull market’s best performing sector

 

In this week’s filter created for The Globe and Mail, we screened for stocks within the greatest contributing sector to the S&P 500 bull market by using the following criteria:

  • Positive change in economic value-added (EVA) over three months and 12 months. This measures the momentum of the wealth-creating ability of the company. Note that EVA is the net operating profit after tax, or NOPAT, minus capital charge (cost of capital times the amount of invested capital);
  • A return on capital greater than 10 per cent, reported as of last quarter’s end;
  • A positive free-cash-flow-to-capital ratio. This ratio gives us a sense of how well the company uses the invested capital to generate free cash flows, which could be used to stimulate growth, distribute or increase dividends, reduce debt, etc. We are looking for a ratio greater than 5 per cent, which is excellent;
  • A dividend-yield greater than 1.5 per cent;
  • A positive share-price return over one year.

Read more in this article written by Noor Hussain, Account Executive at Inovestor Inc. 

Seeking Canadian wealth creators, with an eye on volatility

 

In the filter created this week for The Globe and Mail, we screened for high quality Canadian stocks with low volatility by using the following criteria:

  • A market capitalization of $500-million or more;
  • A beta of one or less. A stock with a beta less than one is considered less volatile than the market;
  • A return on capital greater than or equal to 12 per cent, reported as of last quarter’s end;
  • A cost of capital less than 10 per cent, reported as of last quarter’s end;
  • A positive sales change over 12 months and 24 months;
  • A positive free-cash-flow-to-capital ratio. This ratio gives a sense of how well the company uses the invested capital to generate free cash flows, which could be used to stimulate growth, distribute or increase dividends, reduce debt, etc. A positive figure is what we are looking for. (Note: Some FCF/capital ratio data were not available.)
  • Dividend-paying companies with a payout variation greater than or equal to zero in each of the past four years (not shown);
  • A positive share-price return over one year.

Read more in this article written by Noor Hussain, Account Executive at Inovestor Inc.

19 small-cap growth stocks and ADRs trading at a discount

In the filter created this week for The Globe and Mail, we screened for U.S and ADR small-cap growth stocks trading at a discount by using the following criteria:

·         A market capitalization between US$250-million and US$2-billion;

·         A future-growth-value-to-market-value (FGV/MV) ratio between minus 70 per cent and zero per cent. Since we are looking for discounted stocks, we are searching for a negative FGV/MV, as this translates into an undervalued stock. (This metric represents the proportion of the market value of the company that is made up of future growth expectations, rather than the actual profit generated.) A negative value indicates that the market hasn’t reacted and thus the price has not taken in the improved performance yet.

·         An economic performance index (EPI) greater than or equal to one. The EPI is the ratio of return on capital to cost of capital. It gives shareholders an idea of how much return the company is generating on each dollar spent;

·         Annual return on capital greater than 5 per cent, reported as of last quarter’s end;

·         Return on capital 12-month spread greater than zero;

·         Positive 12-month sales change;

·         Positive 12-month stock-price change.

Read more in this article written by Noor Hussain, Account Executive at Inovestor Inc.