Monthly Archives

October 2019

Number Cruncher Extra – Eleven Canadian companies with profit growth

We touched upon Rogers Communication (RCI.B) briefly in the number cruncher written for the Globe and Mail yesterday which focused on Canadian companies with profit growth. What’s interesting with Rogers Communication is that even though profits and EVA have been on a nice incline, the stock price disagreed and has been slipping since March 2019. This occurrence pushed up the stock’s intrinsic value above its current price for the first time in 2 years.

In addition, we can look at the future-growth-value (FGV) graph for a double confirmation as to whether or not the stock is undervalued, overvalued, or fairly valued.  The FGV metric represents the proportion of the market value of the company that is made up of future growth expectations rather than the actual profit generated. The higher the percentage, the higher the baked-in premium for expected growth. Take a look at the graph below, during Q1 2019 there was a small premium factored into the stock price. In Q2 that premium disappeared, and the stock was fairly priced. And now, in Q3 – the stock was valued at a discount to its actual potential.

For subscribers to StockPointer, you can select the link below and adjust the screener to your liking.

Eleven Canadian companies with profit growth

Amid earnings season, investors are eager to see how companies on their watch list and in their portfolios have performed during the latest quarter. Today, we will search for Canadian dividend-paying companies with growing returns on capital invested and rising profits.

For the Globe and Mail this week, we look for Eleven Canadian companies with profit growth.

We screened the Canadian stock universe by focusing on the following criteria:

  • Market capitalization greater than $500-million;
  • Three-month and 12-month growth in net operating profit (NOP). This is a measure of operating efficiency that excludes operating costs, focusing on the company’s core operations;
  • Three-month and 12-month growth in the return on capital (ROC). This is a profitability ratio that measures the returns expected for both debt and equity investors;
  • A current economic performance index (EPI) equal to or greater than one – this ratio is the return on capital to the cost of capital. It gives shareholders an idea of how much return the company is generating on each dollar spent. An EPI of one would indicate that return of capital is just enough to cover the costs of capital.
  • Dividend yield greater than 2 per cent;
  • Free-cash-flow-to-capital ratio. This metric gives us an idea of how efficiently the company converts its invested capital to free cash flow, which is the amount left after all capital expenditures have been accounted for. It is an important measure because it gives us the company’s financial capacity to pay dividends, reduce debt and pursue growth opportunities. We are always looking for a positive ratio.
Log in to you account to get additional information or to modify the original screener

 

Wave of new products hits ETF market

In this research report created this month for The Globe And Mail, we look at Canadian ETFs: September’s launches and terminations.

The Canadian ETF industry ended September with assets under management of $188-billion. A wave of new products was launched during the month and three providers announced ETF closures.

New additions include two alternative ETFs from AGF Investments, the AGFiQ US Market Neutral Anti-Beta CAD-Hedged ETF (“QBTL”) and the AGFiQ US Long/Short Dividend Income CAD-Hedged ETF (“QUDV”). Each of the ETFs charges a management fee of 0.55%.

QBTL seeks performance results that correspond to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the Dow Jones U.S. Thematic Market Neutral Anti-Beta Index (CAD-Hedged). The index is market neutral and sector neutral – meaning the number of long and short positions in each sector in the index approximate the weighting of that sector in the index universe. It is designed to capture the spread return between the long positions on low-beta companies and short positions on high-beta companies.

QUDV seeks performance results that correspond to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the Indxx Hedged Dividend Income Currency-Hedged CAD Index, a sector neutral index which is designed to measure the performance of a strategy utilizing three portfolios: long positions on high dividend paying companies, short positions on no or low dividend paying companies, and a long position in the Indxx Cash Index.

The industry is saturated with over 700 ETFs in the Canadian universe, ETFs that are not lucrative are being terminated or merged with other funds. For instance, as a result of a purchase and sale agreement, whereby Hamilton ETFs will acquire the management contract of Purpose Global Financials Income Fund (“PFG”), PFG will merge into the Hamilton Australian Financials Yield ETF (“HFA”), effective on or about October 25, 2019.

Source: Inovestor Inc.

As investors are increasingly aware of effects of fees on their returns, asset managers are lowering fees to stay competitive. Mackenzie Investments slashed fees on its traditional index ETF suite by up to 10bps, making these ETFs among the most affordable ones in their respective categories.

Source: Inovestor Inc.

Find the full report here

This article is written by Kimberly Yip Woon Sun,  ETF Analyst at Inovestor Inc. 

StockPointer® Canadian Equities Model Portfolio Transactions – October 2019

We have rebalanced the Nasdaq Inovestor Canadian Index based on our Canadian Model Portfolio, which will be effective on October 18th after market close. Here are the details:

In:

1. Ritchie Bros Auctioneers Inc. (RBA) – Market Trend. Increase in the Industrial sector as seen in the Top 100 index.

2. Evertz (ET) – Market Trend – Increase in the Industrial sector as seen in the Top 100 index.

3. Parkland Fuel Corporation (PKI) – Market Trend – Increase in the Energy sector as seen in the Top 100 index.

Out:

1. Bell Canada (BCE) – Market Trend. Decrease in the Telecommunications Services sector as seen in the Top 100 index.

2. Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CM)- Market Trend. Decrease in the Financial sector as seen in the Top 100 index.

3. Linamar Corp (LNR) – Market Trend – Decrease in the Consumer Discretionary sector as seen in the Top 100 index.

Portfolio Manager’s Q3 Commentary

The S&P/TSX Composite Total Return Index increased by 2.5% in the third quarter. This adds to this years’ gains for a YTD return of 19.1%. During Q3, the S&P500 produced a 1.2% return for a YTD rate of 18.7% and the MSCI ACWI ex USA posted a 1.1% return leading to a 16.6% YTD total return.

Over the 3rd quarter, most company results were inline or better than expected. Interest sensitive sectors such as Utilities and REITS performed the best due to lower long-term interest rates.

In addition, the FED confirmed its dovish stance by reflecting the FED meeting minutes that were perceived to be accommodating. The FED had hinted that they would be open to reduce rates further if economic slowdown was visible. As a result, the Financials sector had the strongest sector rally in the month of September compared to the rest of the market.

NQICA in Q3 returned 3.9% leading to a YTD return of 21.1% versus the S&P/TSX composite which returned 2.5% in Q3 and 19.1% YTD. The one-year return for NQICA is 8.2% in comparison to the S&P/TSX which generated 7.1%.

The worst performers in the NQICA in Q3 were Stella Jones (SJ) with a return of -17.8%, due to the departure of the CEO, and CCL Industries (CCL.B) with a -16.52% return, due to poor quarterly results and increased insider selling. On the other hand, the best performers were Equitable Group (EQB) up 43.46%, due to excellent quarterly results and improvement in the Canadian real estate statistics, and Metro Inc. (MRU) up 19.11% based on great earnings and a positive update on the integration o the Jean-Coutu acquisition.

Number Cruncher Extra – Ten utilities with the power to generate dividend growth

A review of the recently ended third quarter shows that the best performing sectors, in both Canadian and U.S. markets, were those that are particularly interest-rate sensitive, such as utilities (up 9 per cent and 6 per cent in the quarter, respectively) and real estate (up 7.4 per cent and 4.9 per cent). Today we focus on utilities. The sector has benefited from the recent decline in long-term interest rates and the market appetite for yielding assets, and it operates largely under the umbrella of long-term contracts. Hence, in our screen we look for defensive utility companies that have an attractive history of dividend growth.

For the Globe and Mail this week, we look for utility companies with the power to generate dividend growth.

We screened the North American utility stock universe by focusing on the following criteria:

  • Market capitalization greater than $5-billion;
  • A low beta – a stock with a beta less than one is considered less volatile than the market and ultimately giving companies a defensive edge;
  • Three-month growth in net operating profit after tax (NOPAT). A measure of operating efficiency that excludes the cost and tax benefits of debt financing by simply focusing on the company’s core operations net of taxes;
  • A current economic performance index (EPI) equal to or greater than one – this ratio is the return on capital to cost of capital. It gives shareholders an idea of how much return the company is generating on each dollar spent; an EPI of one would indicate that return of capital are just sufficient to cover the costs of capital.
  • Dividend yield greater than 2 per cent and dividend growth over one-, two- and four-year periods;
  • A positive 12-month change in the economic value-added (EVA) metric – a positive figure shows us that the company’s profit is increasing at a faster and greater pace than the costs of capital. The EVA is the economic profit generated by the company and is calculated as the NOPAT minus capital expenses.
For subscribers to StockPointer, you can select the link below and adjust the screener to your liking.

Ten utilities with the power to generate dividend growth

A review of the recently ended third quarter shows that the best performing sectors, in both Canadian and U.S. markets, were those that are particularly interest-rate sensitive, such as utilities (up 9 per cent and 6 per cent in the quarter, respectively) and real estate (up 7.4 per cent and 4.9 per cent). Today we focus on utilities. The sector has benefited from the recent decline in long-term interest rates and the market appetite for yielding assets, and it operates largely under the umbrella of long-term contracts. Hence, in our screen we look for defensive utility companies that have an attractive history of dividend growth.

For the Globe and Mail this week, we look for utility companies with the power to generate dividend growth.

We screened the North American utility stock universe by focusing on the following criteria:

  • Market capitalization greater than $5-billion;
  • A low beta – a stock with a beta less than one is considered less volatile than the market and ultimately giving companies a defensive edge;
  • Three-month growth in net operating profit after tax (NOPAT). A measure of operating efficiency that excludes the cost and tax benefits of debt financing by simply focusing on the company’s core operations net of taxes;
  • A current economic performance index (EPI) equal to or greater than one – this ratio is the return on capital to cost of capital. It gives shareholders an idea of how much return the company is generating on each dollar spent; an EPI of one would indicate that return of capital are just sufficient to cover the costs of capital.
  • Dividend yield greater than 2 per cent and dividend growth over one-, two- and four-year periods;
  • A positive 12-month change in the economic value-added (EVA) metric – a positive figure shows us that the company’s profit is increasing at a faster and greater pace than the costs of capital. The EVA is the economic profit generated by the company and is calculated as the NOPAT minus capital expenses.

Log in to you account to get additional information or to modify the original screener